Snow Days and Creativity

 

My office is closed today, and I’m exceedingly grateful to have time to putter, write and read. Greg Sandow has a wonderful, thought-provoking article up at ArtsJournal today about music schools and the dearth of creativity found therein.

But how do we do this? How do we foster creativity — celebrate the students who already are creative, and encourage the others to be — without turning the school upside down?

When we hear auditions every fall, we hear hordes of singers who are doing everything right – intonation, articulation, dynamic variation, strong language skills, good dramatic arcs to their arias. And shamefully, afterwards I often struggle to remember their performances. Sure, some of my mental fog is due to the sheer volume of folks that we hear in a short time. But more often it’s because the performances we see are careful. They are note perfect and earnest but not very memorable. By memorable, I mean that the singer has demonstrated that they’re careful students and stewards of the repertoire, but they’ve left many of the most important questions unanswered: they leave the room and I find that I haven’t learned anything about them or their artistry, how the aria resonates with them personally. It’s like scanning a CGI crowd scene, looking for one true facial expression.

(Caution: there are those of you who are memorable, because you’ve put the passion into the performance but are not quite as careful as you should’ve been in the learning process. It’s a double-edged sword, I realize… but please know that the preceding paragraph is not for you – go practice!)

I’ll agree with Mr. Sandow – discipline is important. Strong choices are exciting. The two should not be as opposed as they seem to be. So I ask you – were you challenged in school to be creative? Who gave you the most support? Where did you struggle?

(The ArtsJournal article is one of a series. I hope you’re looking forward to the next installment as much as I am.)

 

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One thought on “Snow Days and Creativity

  1. I’m so glad to read this post, cause I keep telling young singers that we want to get to know them in an audition or performance situation! It’s not about judges sitting there being mean, it’s about people waiting to let someone grab their attention.

    As for who challenged me in school to be creative–my piano teacher Ralph Zitterbart at CMU and Kenneth Griffiths at CCM both taught me that playing the notes and rhythms are only the first step. Music is what lies beyond that. And I still remember the moment when I first devoted myself to music; I was a sophomore in college, playing in piano class and the reaction of my fellow students proved that my inner-change was not unnoticed. It actually made me more nervous than I’d been before, but it also helped me to improve much faster than ever!

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